Breaking out of the Temporal Prison: On Native Cultural Production in the Era of Late Colonialism

This article is part of a continuum of writing that takes as its primary focus the autoethnographic, phenomenological, and structural investigation of Nativeness within the context of north american settler colonialism, coloniality, late-capitalist postmodernity, and the modern/colonial/capitalist world-system.  By Nativeness I here mean that general category, or sense of being, which brings together the diverse…

Marxism, Coloniality, “Man”, & Euromodern Science

While it may be unfashionable in many circles that I move within, I do not, nor have I ever, hidden the fact that for many years my primary theoretical grounding and outlook on the world could best be described as some kind of Marxism.  This was still very much so the case when I began…

Settler Colonialism and the Incommensurable Cartography of the Savage Indian

At the heart of the ongoing ontological and symbolic requirement of continuous Native death and dispossession, is a fundamental question of the construction of The Indian, Indians, and of Indian sovereignty and how it allows the Native to be both cast out, and to a priori always-already cast out, that is to say: always-already abjected. For the purposes of my argument here I take sites of multiplicity of The Indian, of Indians-as-Persons, and of Indian Sovereignty as indicative of, as well as manifestations of, the same, primordial ontological condition within, against and before the social ontology of settler colonialism. To use the wording of Billy-Ray Belcourt, perhaps then we can think here of Indianness as a kind of ante-ontology, in that “it is prior to and therefor disruptive of ontology” (2016: 24), or as Jodi Byrd’s Indian Errant which foregrounds the formation of all else (2011).